Bethel Osuagwu, Derek Jones

Stoke Mandeville Spinal Research

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Assessment of the orthotic and long-term functional gain of the SEM Glove in people with chronic spinal cord injury

High-level spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to severe impairment of hand function making an individual dependent on other people for activities of daily living (ADL). The soft extra muscle (SEM) Glove is a device that could provide both orthotic benefits and rehabilitative effects while remaining compact and light.The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the SEM Glove as an orthotic and rehabilitative device. The study intends to recruit 15 individuals with chronic SCI resulting in impaired hand function. The participants will use the SEM Glove at home to perform a set task and ADL for at least four hours a day for 12 weeks. They will be assessed before getting the Glove and at six weeks interval for 18 weeks using functional and neurological measures. The study is currently on-going. This talk, will present the design, challenges and the results so far.

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