Theatre 2

Wednesday 6th June

Thursday 7th June

speaker

11.00 - 11.30

Derek Jones PhD, MBA

Anatomical Concepts (UK) Ltd

Biofeedback techniques are about optimising physiological processes for better health. That to me sounds like a good proposition for application in rehabilitation. Biofeedback to some people still seems too good to be true despite it’s wide application in most parts of the world. The UK lags behind. In this presentation we look at what it is, how to do it and how to apply it.

speaker

11.45 - 12.15

Nechama Karman, PT MS PCS

Braking Bad: Developing Eccentric Control in Clients with CNS Dysfunction

Eccentric muscle contractions are the brakes of the movement system. In the normal gait pattern, the majority of muscle contractions are eccentric, yielding remarkable efficiency: harnessing momentum and ground reaction forces, minimizing the energy cost of walking. In individuals with neurological injuries, movement impairments impede the ability to generate eccentric contractions or to time muscle contractions correctly, yielding co-contraction and inefficiency. We will identify how these impairments impede postural control and gait ability and how to specifically address them using voicing as a mechanism to promote eccentric muscle contractions in intervention programs to minimize negative effects on gait and maximize walking performance. Video cases will allow participants to view application of these methods using a variety of therapeutic handling techniques and functional tasks.

speaker

12.30 - 13.00

Katherine Baker

The Parkinson’s UK Exercise Framework

The seminar will cover the background to the exercise framework and discuss the process of developing the framework. The aim of the framework and the seminar will be to consider how physical activity can be incorporated into the management of Parkinson’s. There will be an overview of the evidence for exercise and discussion of how this was incorporated into the framework. The exercise framework aims to provide tailored advice regardless of disease stage and the seminar will consider ways that health care professions can enable people with Parkinson’s to exercise. It is also important to acknowledge potential barriers to exercise and some of the complexities of maintaining activity levels when living with Parkinson’s.

speaker

13.15 - 13.45

Professor Nick Alderman

Untangling the mystery of how to measure neurobehavioral disability: SASNOS

Neurobehavioral disability (NBD) resulting from acquired brain injury has significant consequences, underpinning challenging behaviour, which is known to be the greatest impediment to community integration. Effective management of NBD increases personal autonomy through reduction of social handicap. However, assessment of NBD has proved problematic, principally because symptoms constitute a diverse, complex, subtle, and pervasive constellation of cognitive-behavioural changes. Standardised measures of NBD have been compiled but suffer from shortcomings that undermine their usefulness. To provide a ‘fit-for-purpose’ assessment tool, the ‘St Andrew’s - Swansea Neurobehavioral Assessment Scale’ (SASNOS) was developed and is available free of charge. In this seminar, attendees will become aware of why and how SASNOS was developed, learn how it is completed, and become familiar with its numerous applications, in particular, how it benefits clinical practice. Finally, progress to date in developing a revised, expanded version of SASNOS in response to user feedback will be shared.

speaker

14.00 - 14.30

Stuart Dunne

Dining with Dignity – The psychological and financial impact

For many of us eating is not a problem, and we take for granted the ability to eat any food anywhere under our own power and control. However, for a small number of individuals in the UK eating is just a process that must be done which can only be carried out with assistance. In this talk we will look at the social aspects of eating and the restrictions that those with upper limb limitations have together with the implications that assisted eating has on family life. Imagine going out for a romantic meal with your husband, (who unfortunately has become paralysed from the shoulders down) and having to either sit alongside him to feed him his dinner whilst eating yours, or sit opposite each other as you would like to, but have to deal with an extra person feeding him. We will explore how life could be so different in social situations if robotic feeding could be portable and designed in such a way that could empower a person’s psychological wellbeing. Also, in the presentation we will demonstrate the financial implications on caring for individuals with upper limb disability and present a case study that shows an effective use of resources and improvement of self-wellbeing. Obi is a revolutionary robotic dining device, which blends cutting-edge robotics, elegant design, intuitive controls and a friendly personality to give individuals who are fed by others the ability to take control of their meals at home and in public.

speaker

14.45 - 15.15

Amanda Farrell

Safe beds for brain injury, complex needs and challenging behaviours

Reducing risk by providing a safe and appropriate environment to allow access to treatment for those with brain injury, complex needs, movement disorders, challenging behaviours or lack of awareness, can be difficult. CIPOLD (2013) advocated “reasonable adjustments” so people with complex needs can “effectively access delivery of care”. We explain how specialist safe beds can provide access to care environments for treatment, rehabilitation or therapeutic work and reduce health inequalities.

speaker

15.30 - 16.00

Dr Neil Bindemann

Living with a brain tumour – building mental fitness

For me it all started in 2015 when I came out of the MRI scanner and was told ‘please can you take a seat here, the doctors are just looking over your scan and would like to come and talk to you’!! Well, that was it, I became a shivering wreck and needed a sweet cup of tea (more sugar than I had ever had!) and a blanket. Using personal experience and a life-long interest in psychology this seminar offers some thoughts and tips on managing mental health via the developing concept of mental fitness, as a very practical approach to support people especially when they encounter a traumatic life event.